South China Sea: US warship sails within 12 miles of China-claimed reef
The USS Dewey came close to Mischief Reef in a so-called ‘freedom of navigation operation’
A US navy image purportedly shows Chinese dredging vessels in the waters around Mischief Reef where USS Dewey carried out a ‘freedom of navigation operation’.
A US navy image purportedly shows Chinese dredging vessels in the waters around Mischief Reef where USS Dewey carried out a ‘freedom of navigation operation’. Photograph: HANDOUT/Reuters
Wednesday 24 May 2017 20.36 EDT
Last modified on Wednesday 24 May 2017 20.52 EDT
A US navy warship sailed within 12 nautical miles of an artificial island built up by China, US officials have said, the first such challenge to Beijing under the Trump administration.
The officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the USS Dewey was sailing close to the Mischief Reef in the Spratly Islands, among a string islets, reefs and shoals over which China has territorial disputes with its neighbours.
The so-called “freedom of navigation operation” comes at a time when president Donald Trump is seeking China’s cooperation to rein in North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs.
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The move, the latest attempt to counter what Washington sees as Beijing’s efforts to limit freedom of navigation in the strategic waters, is likely to anger China.
Under the previous administration, the US navy conducted such voyages through the South China Sea. The last such operation was carried out in October, approved by then-president Barack Obama.
China’s extensive claims to the South China Sea, which sees about $5 trillion in ship-borne trade pass every year, are challenged by Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam, as well as Taiwan.
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